Gut-Check for Guys: Questioning Your Approach to Fitness After 40

I seek a sustainable plan for fitness, nutrition, and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of my life. I want to feel great, look (at least) pretty good for my age, keep getting happier, and live long.

Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions…

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I seek a sustainable plan for fitness after 40: physical health and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of my life. I want to feel great, look my best, keep getting happier, and live long.

Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions…

1. Exercise: what do I need more (and less) of?

We need to purposefully mix endurance, strength, flexibility and balance. Obvious? Many “fit” guys don’t do this – I’ve been one of them (I was “lucky” to have some injuries over time push me toward more variety). Some of us never had a consistent regimen, and now need one. Wherever you start, the goal is a healthy mix.

Runners: That 3rd or 4th run this week serving you as well as a strength session or a swim? (reverse question for swimmers)

Weights guys: Skip a set or two (or a day) and do some maintenance on the heart and lungs?

Cyclists: What can you do for non-cycling muscles and skeletal benefits of weight-bearing exercise?

All-around gym / boot camp guys: Question for you in “Serenity & Joy” below.

Brothers, with your thriving in mind, I urge you to get more balanced. Try living each week with (minimum) two cardio workouts, one strength session, one trip to the pool or onto the yoga mat (yoga?!! more on that here), and something outdoors (some of these can be combined – that’s beautiful). For concrete weekly suggestions, check out this post.

2. Nutrition: what simple, non-“diet” approach can I live with?

If you’re reading this, you know exercise alone isn’t enough anymore. We need the right quantity of food, and a high batting average on quality. Most of us benefit from a smart mix of vitamins and supplements.

In future posts, I’ll explore many questions we have in this realm. But to begin with, please start:

⇒ Reducing refined sugars and flours (bonus: virtually eliminate these, other than on pig day)

⇒ Upping your protein (some at every meal – lean is better, but occasional bacon won’t kill you)

⇒ Eating fruits and vegetables (duh)…focus on low-sugar cold-weather fruits like apples and berries

⇒ Eating good fats (nuts, avocados, olive oil) – welcome back to the world of peanut butter

⇒ Eating just a little less at each meal – OK if it means you need a snack at some other time

⇒ Avoiding empty calories in drinks (includes cutting down on the booze a little, dude)

Combining some of the above, it is a beautiful thing if you can enjoy a “manly salad” with a protein added and a reasonable amount of some healthy dressing, 3-5 times per week (and skip the bread).

3. Serenity & Joy: How can I get more as I get older?

Why this question here? In the end, this is what it’s all about – the killer benefit all others are in service of. And our physicality should be a huge source.

joyful-dog

When you finish a run, get out of the pool, conclude a yoga practice, complete a hike with your dog, paddle across the lake – you feel it not just physically, but also emotionally, and somewhere deep where those two things are one. There are physiological mind/body explanations, but also the explicit comfort of knowing you’re taking care of yourself, and doing something primal that your ancestor might have done a thousand years ago. There’s destiny and poetry here, man.

Which brings us back to a choice facing the all-around-gym/boot camp guy: can you evolve your routine to get space to breathe, some solitude, some more serenity and joy?

And for all of us, I suggest consciously planning physical fitness to include places and experiences—and occasionally, adventures—that deepen these emotional components of being active. This is a major source of gasoline for us to keep going, when the world barrages us with reasons not to.

4. Implications for Fitness After 40

So if you craft and follow the right plan, you won’t get fat…you won’t lose too much muscle and become a skinny old guy…you may not have a six-pack, but people will know you take care of yourself (and more important, you’ll know)…you’ll keep your heart and lungs as strong as they can be…and you’ll greatly enhance peace of mind and joyfulness as you keep climbing life’s mountain. That’s OlderBeast.

“After all, when the truth is told, you can get you want, or you can just get old.” (Billy Joel, Vienna)

 

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Study Says Running’s the Biggest Life Extender. Give Credit to Runners’ “Architect” Fitness Approach.

This week, the NY Times cited a Cooper Institute study that found running is correlated with a higher increase in life span than any other exercise. (“An Hour of Running May Add 7 Hours to Your Life” – see link below).

The study’s authors acknowledge this is a “correlation” and not “causation” finding. Quick illustration of causation vs. correlation. A guy keeps finding when he sleeps with his clothes and shoes on, he wakes up with a headache. Did sleeping that way cause the headache? No, it was correlated with it (they frequently happen together), with the common root cause being tequila the night before.

My hunch is this finding is an important correlation between running and positive lifespan impact. It’s not the running itself causing incremental benefit vs. other exercise types. Other exercises or mixes thereof can provide the same physical and mind-body benefits. It’s that, critically, runners are likely to have an “Architect” view of their own fitness, and associated sustainable behavior patterns. These are the causative factors behind maximum exercise impact.

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High-Intensity Interval Program Reviews: Orange Theory Fitness

There’s a lot of buzz around High-Intensity Interval Training, a.k.a. “HIIT”. Research studies highlight its effectiveness and time-efficiency for fitness development and calorie burning. New HIIT-centric gym concepts are being heavily marketed.

HITT interests me because of its inherent fitness benefits, and because it often combines endurance and strength work in an intense way.

I’ve started checking out HITT gym concepts and at-home workout programs, to add HITT into my own mix and also share findings via OlderBeast. This is the first of several reviews, starting with Orange Theory Fitness (“OTF” for short here).

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Weight Maintenance? Why You Need Some “Loss” Days to Balance Inevitable “Gain” Days.

Unless you live with otherworldly consistency, even “weight maintenance” will have small ups-and-downs. Some days, calories from food and drink exceed those you burn. For maintenance, then, you need other days when calories burned exceed those consumed.

Here’s an illustration of how inevitable—and how high-impact— “calorie surplus” days are. And then, suggestions for how to balance them with modest, measured “calorie deficit” responses.

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Get Back, Man…to Physical Things You Once Thrived On

I think we all recognize—if we really stop and think–that we lose some precious things as we move through life. Do you have something you “used to” do, that was really good for you physically and mentally…but which you don’t do anymore?

However natural and understandable this is, it has multiple adverse effects we don’t want:

⇒ Physical: we lose the contributions of that activity to our ongoing quest for endurance, strength, flexibility and balance – and the diversity of movement that’s so important to all-over fitness

7 Comments
  1. […] ⇒ Fitness and nutrition are major pillars of Wellness in their own right. The more we keep up a level of overall physical fitness (endurance, strength, flexibility, balance) and start/keep eating right, the more likely we are to enjoy an overall sense of well-being in life.  Many OlderBeast posts are all about this, but if you’re new here, please start with this. […]

  2. […] Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions (continue reading)… […]

  3. […] Helping you be your own Architect is OlderBeast’s core mission. (If you’re new here, check out this introductory post). […]

  4. […] run twice, go swimming once, do two strength-training sessions, and do a yoga practice. Moving to a more-varied fitness regime is a key OlderBeast […]

  5. […] run twice, go swimming once, do two strength-training sessions, and do a yoga practice. Moving to a more-varied fitness regime is a key OlderBeast […]

  6. […] Past 40, God-given levels of these physical traits do start to erode. It’s only by our conscious and continuous effort, via a good fitness mix, that we maintain them. This foundational OlderBeast article talks more about this need to seek more diverse fitness. […]

  7. […] or weight training guy confronting this conflict, or just starting/re-starting fitness now…you need a varied routine, brother. What the doctor orders for us nowadays is rotating among 2+ different cardio activities, […]

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