Gut-Check for Guys: Questioning Your Approach to Fitness After 40

I seek a sustainable plan for fitness, nutrition, and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of my life. I want to feel great, look (at least) pretty good for my age, keep getting happier, and live long.

Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions…

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I seek a sustainable plan for fitness after 40: physical health and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of my life. I want to feel great, look my best, keep getting happier, and live long.

Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions…

1. Exercise: what do I need more (and less) of?

We need to purposefully mix endurance, strength, flexibility and balance. Obvious? Many “fit” guys don’t do this – I’ve been one of them (I was “lucky” to have some injuries over time push me toward more variety). Some of us never had a consistent regimen, and now need one. Wherever you start, the goal is a healthy mix.

Runners: That 3rd or 4th run this week serving you as well as a strength session or a swim? (reverse question for swimmers)

Weights guys: Skip a set or two (or a day) and do some maintenance on the heart and lungs?

Cyclists: What can you do for non-cycling muscles and skeletal benefits of weight-bearing exercise?

All-around gym / boot camp guys: Question for you in “Serenity & Joy” below.

Brothers, with your thriving in mind, I urge you to get more balanced. Try living each week with (minimum) two cardio workouts, one strength session, one trip to the pool or onto the yoga mat (yoga?!! more on that here), and something outdoors (some of these can be combined – that’s beautiful). For concrete weekly suggestions, check out this post.

2. Nutrition: what simple, non-“diet” approach can I live with?

If you’re reading this, you know exercise alone isn’t enough anymore. We need the right quantity of food, and a high batting average on quality. Most of us benefit from a smart mix of vitamins and supplements.

In future posts, I’ll explore many questions we have in this realm. But to begin with, please start:

⇒ Reducing refined sugars and flours (bonus: virtually eliminate these, other than on pig day)

⇒ Upping your protein (some at every meal – lean is better, but occasional bacon won’t kill you)

⇒ Eating fruits and vegetables (duh)…focus on low-sugar cold-weather fruits like apples and berries

⇒ Eating good fats (nuts, avocados, olive oil) – welcome back to the world of peanut butter

⇒ Eating just a little less at each meal – OK if it means you need a snack at some other time

⇒ Avoiding empty calories in drinks (includes cutting down on the booze a little, dude)

Combining some of the above, it is a beautiful thing if you can enjoy a “manly salad” with a protein added and a reasonable amount of some healthy dressing, 3-5 times per week (and skip the bread).

3. Serenity & Joy: How can I get more as I get older?

Why this question here? In the end, this is what it’s all about – the killer benefit all others are in service of. And our physicality should be a huge source.

joyful-dog

When you finish a run, get out of the pool, conclude a yoga practice, complete a hike with your dog, paddle across the lake – you feel it not just physically, but also emotionally, and somewhere deep where those two things are one. There are physiological mind/body explanations, but also the explicit comfort of knowing you’re taking care of yourself, and doing something primal that your ancestor might have done a thousand years ago. There’s destiny and poetry here, man.

Which brings us back to a choice facing the all-around-gym/boot camp guy: can you evolve your routine to get space to breathe, some solitude, some more serenity and joy?

And for all of us, I suggest consciously planning physical fitness to include places and experiences—and occasionally, adventures—that deepen these emotional components of being active. This is a major source of gasoline for us to keep going, when the world barrages us with reasons not to.

4. Implications for Fitness After 40

So if you craft and follow the right plan, you won’t get fat…you won’t lose too much muscle and become a skinny old guy…you may not have a six-pack, but people will know you take care of yourself (and more important, you’ll know)…you’ll keep your heart and lungs as strong as they can be…and you’ll greatly enhance peace of mind and joyfulness as you keep climbing life’s mountain. That’s OlderBeast.

“After all, when the truth is told, you can get you want, or you can just get old.” (Billy Joel, Vienna)

 

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Fitness & the 5 Stages of Fatherhood

For those who have or will have the opportunity to be a father, it’s one of the very greatest and most meaningful parts of life.

Getting and staying fit – via exercise, nutrition and mind-and-spirit wellness – is one of the most important things you can do to improve and sustain your life and your enjoyment of it. For the benefit of yourself and your children.

So, with “uber” life goals in mind, commitments to fathering and fitness SHOULD go hand in hand.

But day-to-day, it’s not always easy to pull off both. Precious time spent with kids heightens time pressure we already feel from work and other “pre-kids” obligations. Fitness is often what gets squeezed out.

With dads – current and future in mind – here are five suggestions for how to follow this “best of both” path, organized by the stages of fatherhood.

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Are We Free Men Capable of Behavior Change – or Marketers’ Negative Stereotype?

Talk to ad industry people and you’ll learn that a disproportionately small share of ads target us 45+ guys. Though we’re a large portion of the population (and consumer spending), those who steer the spending of ad dollars are more interested, proportionally, in women and younger guys.

But OlderBeast isn’t about business, so why bring this up? Because it reflects “conventional wisdom” about us: that we rarely try new things, and that in many categories (e.g. nutrition), women make decisions for us.

Why highlight this at OlderBeast? As positive provocation for OlderBeasts: Let’s cultivate willingness to experiment and change, and take charge of health-impacting decisions for ourselves!

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“Too Busy” To Exercise Because You’re in “Survival Mode? Try This Minimum Fitness Plan…or Else

I have a few friends who are longtime habitual exercisers, but still look at me like I’m on a different planet when I talk about the finer points of moving from five to six workouts a week.

Why? They currently feel in “survival mode” with seemingly 24/7 work demands, business travel, and school-age kids in the house. The time when they can work out five-plus times a week seems somewhere down the road.

Fair enough. I’ve been there. But no matter what, when survival mode conditions last more than a week, you simply need to figure out how to maintain at least basic fitness.

There’s a minimum threshold below which “postponing fitness” is not the answer, even for short-term productivity, let alone long-term thriving.

So here are a few simple but powerful fitness and Wellness tactics to adopt when life puts you into survival mode.

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In the Quest for Fitness After 40, You Gotta Pay Your Dues

One big OlderBeast goal is to help you evolve your outlook on fitness – and experiment with alternative activities – so you WANT to work out. Another important goal: help you PLAN so exercise isn’t super-hard to fit into your schedule.

But some days you’ll find yourself 0-for-2 on these dimensions. You really don’t want to do the workout you’ve planned. And something about that day’s schedule changed to make it hard to fit it in, anyway.

In such cases, sometimes you definitely need to be flexible, listen to your body, and reload for tomorrow. But sometimes you’ve got to suck it up and do your planned workout, man.

7 Comments
  1. […] ⇒ Fitness and nutrition are major pillars of Wellness in their own right. The more we keep up a level of overall physical fitness (endurance, strength, flexibility, balance) and start/keep eating right, the more likely we are to enjoy an overall sense of well-being in life.  Many OlderBeast posts are all about this, but if you’re new here, please start with this. […]

  2. […] Of course. But how to really do it? We all face—and can powerfully answer—the same questions (continue reading)… […]

  3. […] Helping you be your own Architect is OlderBeast’s core mission. (If you’re new here, check out this introductory post). […]

  4. […] run twice, go swimming once, do two strength-training sessions, and do a yoga practice. Moving to a more-varied fitness regime is a key OlderBeast […]

  5. […] run twice, go swimming once, do two strength-training sessions, and do a yoga practice. Moving to a more-varied fitness regime is a key OlderBeast […]

  6. […] Past 40, God-given levels of these physical traits do start to erode. It’s only by our conscious and continuous effort, via a good fitness mix, that we maintain them. This foundational OlderBeast article talks more about this need to seek more diverse fitness. […]

  7. […] or weight training guy confronting this conflict, or just starting/re-starting fitness now…you need a varied routine, brother. What the doctor orders for us nowadays is rotating among 2+ different cardio activities, […]

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