Aging Guys, Don’t Let “I WOULDN’T” Slowly Become “I CAN’T”

What if most of the time you had the discretionary opportunity to move, to use your body (not just during a “workout” but at other times like walking or taking the stairs)…you didn’t do it? But you thought, “I could, but I won’t?”

Here’s what I think happens with this “slippery slope” attitude and behavior pattern…

by

If some of you guys think OlderBeast articles are sometimes too long or complex, rejoice! This is short and simple, man.

I was at a business event recently where the organizers mistakenly told attendees the venue was close to public transportation. It  turned out it was two miles away, actually. I had the time and I’m always up for a walk, so I hoofed it to the event from the Berkeley, CA BART station.

During the networking part of the event, one mundane but common topic was “so, how did YOU get here tonight?” (referring to the confusion about how doable public transportation was). In a small group of people, I answered the question by reporting that I’d walked.

Another guy in the circle said: “I could walk two miles…but I wouldn’t.”

There was a polite mini-laugh, and the conversation went on. But later, I reflected on the implications of this sentiment.

What if most of the time we had the discretionary opportunity to move, to use our body (not just during a “workout” but at other times like walking or taking the stairs)…we didn’t do it? But we thought, “I could, but this time I won’t?”

Here’s what I think happens with this “slippery slope” attitude and behavior pattern:

  1. Little by little, a gap develops between the fitness level we could have and that which we do have.
  2. When we forsake walking in particular, we also miss out on precious stress management and unhurried reflection time.
  3. Then our decline curve of aging plays out with us avoiding, instead of embracing, those “extra credit” opportunities to move, to burn calories, and to keep muscles bearing loads.
  4. Then one day, the thing we avoided by choice — like the two-mile walk, maybe with some hills — isn’t so easy.
  5. Eventually, where we once said “I could, but I won’t”…we find ourselves remorsefully thinking, “I would, but I can’t.”

So brothers, let’s seize every chance we can to preserve and protect our strength, endurance and vitality for as long as we can. Let’s not be the guy who says he could; let’s be the guy who does. We’ll be better for it that very day, and over the long term!

You may also like

article-image
Mindfulness & Stress Management , Philosophy & Motivation

5 Ways to Feel Happier Every Day (and Get More Productive Because You’re Happier)

Some big-picture components of happiness are long-term endeavors to improve. But there are also surprisingly simple “evolve your state of mind” things you can do to increase feelings of happiness in the short term.

You can take active steps to increase your feelings of happiness every day — and let those feelings make you more effective in all you other goals and endeavors. One example? Think of the “STAGE” verbs — savor, thanks, asipire, give and emphathize.

article-image
Fitness Planning & Gear , Nutrition & Recipes , Philosophy & Motivation

OlderBeast: Five Things to Know About It for 2017

Happy new year, brothers (and sorry for the “clickbait” title of this post – I hate these “X things” headlines, but in this case it feels authentic… though I still won’t do it again until 2018, promise).

Since OlderBeast.com just kicked off recently, this may be the first you’re hearing of it. So, this post is to introduce the concept and suggest a few articles on fitness, nutrition and wellness to help make 2017 your greatest year yet.

article-image
Philosophy & Motivation

Aging Guys’ Fitness Motivation Secret: Embrace the Connection to Joy & Meaning

At this time of year, as autumn deepens, challenges mount to our motivation for fitness and nutrition. Shorter, colder days. Impending snow and sleet (or even just the rain that daunts Californians). Scrambling to complete work-related things before The Holidays. And then Holidays themselves (I’ll have pumpkin and apple pie, thanks very much).

So right about now, we can all use a reminder about what motivates us to stay fit and vital. That’s why I want to reaffirm and expand on the biggest, most-positive motivation out there: thinking of fitness as a major enabler of Joy and Meaning in your life.

article-image
Philosophy & Motivation , Travel & Adventure

Why We 40+ Guys Still Need Some Adventure in Life

I love writing for OlderBeast, but sometimes worry I sound like I’ve “figured it all out.” NOT the case, man. I’m right alongside you, seeking smart choices and effective approaches to maximize life—to feel great, look my best, keep getting happier, and live long.

One topic where I feel 100% like “audience”—where these words are for myself as much as you: We should seek out more “adventure”—to inspire fitness, but also to enhance the more psychological and emotional aspects of Wellness.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.