In defense (and praise) of the EASY workout

It’s important to keep physically challenging ourselves as we age. That’s why OlderBeast feature things like push-up challenges, exhortations to increase your weekly workout frequency, and calls to keep on running uphill.

But the name of the game is to do it thoughtfully, man — in a way we can sustain for years and hopefully decades. And on some days that calls for a game-time decision to do an EASY workout.

There’s the planned easy workout, to recover from intense effort yesterday or get ready to go hard tomorrow. But here, I want to talk about something different…a last-minute call to just do something “light” today.

Maybe a shorter and/or slower run. Or just some light body weight exercises and stretching. Or some lower-intensity cardio on a machine and then a short core routine.

The idea of switching to an easier workout is really about our relationship with motivation: having more than one response to call on when we feel unmotivated.

by

It’s important to keep physically challenging ourselves as we age. That’s why OlderBeast features things like push-up challenges, exhortations to increase your weekly workout frequency, and calls to keep on running uphill.

But the name of the game is to do it thoughtfully, man — in a way we can sustain for years and hopefully decades. And on some days that calls for a game-time decision to do an EASY workout.

There’s the planned easy workout, to recover from intense effort yesterday or get ready to go hard tomorrow. But here, I want to talk about something different…a last-minute call to just do something “light” today.

Maybe a shorter and/or slower run. Or just some light body weight exercises and stretching. Or some lower-intensity cardio on a machine and then a short core routine.

The idea of switching to an easier workout is really about our relationship with motivation: having more than one response to call on when we feel unmotivated.

The Impromptu Easy Workout — a Third Option When De-Motivation Strikes

Sometimes the workouts we plan are simply “hard” when you think about them objectively. You going to run 5 miles, do an hour of strength & conditioning, swim a mile? That’s great, brother.

But occasionally these plans create a binary choice between “Hard” and “Nothing.” And when we’re tired or otherwise not at our best, “Nothing” can tend to win that battle.

This is especially true if we’ve had a recent interruption in our fitness habits due to travel, aches and pains, or other life circumstances. At such times, we’re a little bit out of the mental groove on fitness and vulnerable to lack of motivation.

For example, if I get even slightly out of my routine of doing a strength workout twice a week, I find myself kind of dreading it and feeling pangs of de-motivation. For other guys, it might be the cardio aspect that’s more prone to this phenomenon.

Feeling this binary Hard vs. Nothing Choice, without any third option, risks letting a “mini-lapse” of fitness turn into a true lapse. And because getting into shape is much harder than staying in shape — and re-starting a habit is much harder than continuing one — the true lapse is an infinitely bigger threat to our long-term goals than not having a “hard enough” workout today!

Benefits

So, under exceptional circumstances that you don’t let become your norm…sometimes just make a last-minute plan adjustment to go easy, dude.

When you do, you’ll experience several benefits.

First, you’ll actually get in a workout today. Something — anything — is better than nothing. An easy workout still gives you a sweat, burns some calories, gets your heart rate up a bit, and does some maintenance of muscle tone. That harder workout you were “gonna” do, but didn’t? Of course, it does none of these things.

Also, the easy workout still brings you the routine mental reset you need even if you’re physically not feeling tip-top today. De-stressing, having some time to yourself, stepping away from the various screens that are so-often in front of you in the 21st Century…with the easy workout instead of the blown-off one, you still get some of this precious benefit.

Finally and most importantly, you won’t seriously threaten the positive habit track you’re on. The discipline of planning, then fulfilling on your plans, won’t be completely violated. And nurturing discipline (and rewards you feel from it) is the biggest battle of all for the OlderBeast.

Conclusions

To be clear, I don’t advocate this as a routine compromise to make. Keep challenging yourself with hard workouts as part of a varied weekly plan. If at first you feel some sluggishness, employ tactics to overcome that lazy urge.

But if the reality is that you’re on your way to blowing off a workout you have planned for today, and nothing else is working…then go EASY, man. You’ll be glad you did.

You may also like

article-image
Fitness Planning & Gear , Mindfulness & Stress Management , Philosophy & Motivation

Why “Solitude + Exercise” is a Key Wellness Formula

One of the great things about certain types of exercise is that we can address two vital questions with one single action: Am I getting enough physical exercise? Am I getting enough high-quality solitude?

I’m willing to be the Oracle of the Obvious sometimes (just ask my wife or kids) But I won’t belabor the “why exercise?” question here.

But let’s discuss “why solitude?” and also “why is exercise time especially good solitude?” These should be prominent themes for any guy doubling down on body-and-soul health.

article-image
Fitness Planning & Gear

For Fast, Clear Results: Try This 10-15 Minute “Yoga Tonic” Each Morning

TWO QUESTIONS:

1. Are you mentally sold on the idea of yoga, but just not able to do it much because of other fitness and life priorities?

In my case, I’m ultra-sold, but I still only do a full yoga practice once a week. I don’t want to displace other workouts or my rest day. But I know I’m missing out on some of yoga’s benefits from this infrequency (especially the flexibility benefit). 

2. Do you feel sometimes feel stiff and sluggish when you get out of bed in the morning? I do.

For both of these reasons, I started doing this 10-15 minute mini-yoga practice most mornings.

I’ve noticed clear improvements in my flexibility and ability to really nail and hold some key poses. And it reliably limbers up and energizes me, too. 

If you’re a seldom-yoga guy, this will bring you (physical and also mental) benefits as a standalone habit. And if you do longer-form yoga practices with some regularity but it’s not feeling like “enough,” this consistent short-form habit will set you up for better performance when you do spend longer on the mat.

article-image
Endurance , Fitness Planning & Gear , Strength

High-Intensity Intervals (HIIT) or Longer/Moderate Workouts? Why You Need Some of Each.

A lot of research shows great benefits can come from shorter workouts (~25-35 minutes total) with alternating periods of high intensity and recovery. So should we stop doing “traditional” runs, bike rides, swims and other cardio sessions, and just do high-intensity interval training (HITT)?

Based on my own experience, a review of what experts are saying, and some simple logic about “why we exercise,” I think the answer is to seek the best of both worlds here.

Incorporate some HIIT benefits into your routine, but do also retain some longer, moderate cardio workouts. Here’s why, and some tips for getting started.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.