Why “men’s fitness” and single-sport “enthusiast” magazines kind of suck

As a 40+ guy seeking balanced fitness, smart nutrition, and the well-being and joy these things contribute to…I’ll take all the help I can get. So, I’m always scouting the media and blog landscape on these topics.

My conclusion: the “media” world (old and new) is failing to truly help 40+ guys seeking a lifelong mix of endurance, strength, flexibility, balance, solid nutrition, tranquility-of-mind, and joy-of-spirit.

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As a 40+ guy seeking balanced fitness, smart nutrition, and the well-being and joy these things contribute to…I’ll take all the help I can get.  So, I’m always scouting the media and blog landscape on these topics.

My conclusion:  the “media” world (old and new) is failing to truly help 40+ guys seeking a lifelong mix of endurance, strength, flexibility, balance, solid nutrition, tranquility-of-mind, and joy-of-spirit.

What “media” do I mean?

In the digital-only realm – blogs and specialized websites – 40+ guys have many fewer resources than women, or younger guys who are more “build muscles” or “single sport” focused.  For example, Google “40+ fitness blog” and you’ll see nearly all search results are blogs written by women, for women.   Or go on YouTube and you can find a large array of weightlifting-oriented enthusiast channels.

So, general-purpose men’s fitness- and health-oriented magazines are a big chunk of what’s out there – like Men’s Health and Men’s Journal.  Then there are narrower “enthusiast” ones – like Runner’s World and Bicycling.

How are these media sources failing us?

Topics include many that don’t resonate with the OlderBeast: The world’s finest cigars!New fall fashion looks!Three ways to get that girl at the office into bed with you this weekend!

Fitness advice is too muscle-building oriented and assumes you’re willing to spend all your time on that (Monster biceps in 28 days!). By the way…show me a 40+ guys with monster biceps, and often times that guy can’t touch his toes or run three miles.

Or, advice assumes you’re focused on just one primary fitness activity (10 great stretches for distance runners!)

There is a short-term, “follow this magic plan” orientation (Get ripped in 45 days!)

Articles have a “more is more” orientation that is the enemy of simplicity and actually reduces usefulness and likelihood you can consistently stick with a plan (1,476 tips for being a better man!)

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But as the saying goes, “it’s easier to be a critic than a craftsman.”  So, constructively, here’s what I hope to do about the shortcomings discussed above.

1. Keep improving OlderBeast.com as a resource for 40+ guys seeking a balanced, long-term approach. An OlderBeast wants to feel great, look (at least) pretty good for his age, keep getting happier, and live long. OlderBeast.com’s heartfelt mission is to help.

2. Inspire you to be “architect” of your own unique fitness and wellness plan for life. Use some of what you find at OlderBeast.com, the best of what you get out of magazines and other sources (which DO have a lot of great stuff)…what you learn from friends…and the personalized “what works?” wisdom you are best-qualified to have for yourself. This post might be a useful place to start.

3. Perhaps, over time, motivate existing media companies to focus more of their impressive, capable resources on the needs of the OlderBeast. If they do, we’ll be grateful.

“Everyday, everyday, everyday I write the book.” (Elvis Costello, song of the same title)

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When a team declares “we WILL run the football,” they commit to guiding principles like: Having a more-patient approach to victory – not trying to “win quickly”…Depending less on flashy or gimmicky approaches – what you see is mainly what you get…and Reducing costly mistakes – fumbles are less common and less damaging than interceptions.

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My friendly challenge here: no matter how fit you think you are, you probably have one or more less-developed areas. Or if you’re just starting or re-starting on fitness, then please take this as a challenge to start off in a comprehensive way from the beginning.

Here are some common chinks in our armor. Let’s start addressing them and thus raise our Expected Thriving Factor for the future!

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