Ditch your Fitness Plan. Thrive Long-term with a Fitness Checklist Instead.

OlderBeast seeks fitness, wellness, and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of life. We want to feel great, look pretty good for our age, keep getting happier, and live long. But everybody wants that. The question is, who makes and follows a plan to get there?

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The OlderBeast philosophy seeks fitness, wellness, and feeling “whole” for the 2nd half of life. We want to feel great, look pretty good for our age, keep getting happier, and live long. But everybody wants that. The question is, who has a sustainable approach to get there, and stay there?

We should have exciting goals to pursue over months and years (run a half-marathon…hike the John Muir trail…cycle 100 miles…rock a headstand on the yoga mat…do 75 push-ups…swim a mile, etc.). But on the path to those, our lives and quests play out day-by-day.

I’m nearing 50. If I live to 90 (knock wood), that’s 14,600 more days. While days off are important as we age, for most of those days I should be physical – and seek physicality’s gifts to tranquility of spirit. So, how should I use my days – how should you use your days – in a purposeful way?

Google “fitness plan.” You’ll find endless links, many to great stuff from smart, experienced people (OlderBeast’s links section points to some). But most plans are so specific and regimented that they’re hard to follow in real life – For Week 1, I do this Monday, this Tuesday, then starting Week 2 do this, etc. It’s hard to live that way, for reasons both logistical and psychological. Am I going to follow someone else’s exact plan for 14,600 days? No way.

Over the course of years and via informal trial and error, I came to realize  it’s much more sustainable to not be overly regimented…to have general activity types and benefits you seek, and keep any given week’s or season’s activity flexible based on circumstances and what you’re feeling.

So, let’s start with more of a flexible CHECKLIST than a “plan.”

OlderBeast™ weekly fitness checklistThis week, will I…

Get at least two cardio sessions of 30+ minutes? Three or four is better, but if you’re active other days, you’ll get some lower-grade cardio from that, too.

⇒ Work core and upper body muscles at least twice? Focus here is the waist up, since most cardio works legs in some way; ideally, also get some leg strength work to ensure balance for leg muscles.

Swim or do a yoga practice? These provide benefits of “controlled breathing” like nothing else, and are low impact.

Take one or two walks, or otherwise ensure I get outdoors for 30+ minutes?

⇒ Work on flexibility alongside these other activities?

Some activities check multiple boxes. So, this could equate to as few as four days (e.g. a run, a swim, and two strength-oriented sessions). Or, it could be six days if each item drives its own activity. Also, you can do two activities on the same day – just get them done, man. Example: a 30-minute+ run and a 20-30 minute calisthenics routine would check two boxes. But if you’re doing these combo days (I try to), make sure you’re still active at least four days a week.

Spread out workouts so you’re not taking two days in a row completely off (or only rarely – occasionally two days off is what the doctor ordered). Or use combo days to move up to three cardio sessions…a swim AND a yoga practice…a leg strength day, etc. For many of us, a five or six day-per-week, consciously varied plan is ideal.

Here are some example weekly plans based on this checklist of core principles. But as you’ve seen, the key idea is to have a checklist in mind and make your own, circumstance-driven plan each week. Get to it, brother.

“I wasn’t born to follow.” (The Byrds, Wasn’t Born to Follow – click to listen)

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Activities , Planning , Uncategorized , Wellness

“Too Busy” To Exercise Because You’re in “Survival Mode? Try This Minimum Fitness Plan…or Else

I have a few friends who are longtime habitual exercisers, but still look at me like I’m on a different planet when I talk about the finer points of moving from five to six workouts a week.

Why? They currently feel in “survival mode” with seemingly 24/7 work demands, business travel, and school-age kids in the house. The time when they can work out five-plus times a week seems somewhere down the road.

Fair enough. I’ve been there. But no matter what, when survival mode conditions last more than a week, you simply need to figure out how to maintain at least basic fitness.

There’s a minimum threshold below which “postponing fitness” is not the answer, even for short-term productivity, let alone long-term thriving.

So here are a few simple but powerful fitness and Wellness tactics to adopt when life puts you into survival mode.

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Activities , Nutrition , Planning , Weight , Wellness

OlderBeast Weekly Web Picks: January 23, 2017

With all the great fitness, nutrition and wellness stuff out there on the Internet…there’s often too much to make sense of. Without an integrating philosophy and approach, it’s hard to interpret, prioritize and orchestrate everything into your own game plan. And your own plan is what you need, to sustain and thrive on for decades.

Helping you be your own Architect is OlderBeast’s core mission. Now, with OlderBeast philosophy as a foundation, we’re starting a weekly “best of the web” post at OlderBeast.com. For fitness, nutrition and Wellness categories, it features a single, useful pointer to highly-relevant and useful stuff.

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Planning

Packaged Fitness Programs? Why Guys Should Declare Independence.

Recently I’m swamped by ads for fitness programs promising unbelievable fast results, declaring themselves better than anything ever conceived before, or playing blatantly to a stereotype of male ego/insecurity.

I’ve done “programs.” The good ones are designed by smart people and will produce results if you’re diligent and intense in following them.

But what to do the day the program is over? Do it all over again?…For the rest of our lives?…Or go back to whatever our fitness regimens were before we started the program?

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90-Day Fitness Program Accomplished – NOW WHAT? (Secrets to Successful Transition)

A comprehensive fitness program for 1-3 months can be great, where each day is planned for you. It ramps up your fitness, teaches you new workout styles and moves, and enforces schedule discipline if you stick with it. But while short-term programs jump-start or accelerate you toward your goals, the most important day of an XX-day program is the day after you’re done.

That’s when you’re at a crossroads between continuing with a new level of discipline, but also expanding and personalizing your fitness approach to make it long-term sustainable; OR slipping back toward your status from the day before you started the program.

I’ve taken each of these roads, brother. Based on that learning, here are suggestions for a successful transition from “XX-day” to “Decades-long.”

7 Comments
  1. […] Wherever you’re starting from, here are suggestions for achieving strength goals as an integrated part of your weekly checklist. […]

  2. […] is great news for guys whose fitness routine is consistent with OlderBeast principles: yoga and swimming, two fitness pillars I’ve urged you to include, provide “controlled […]

  3. […] Start with a small number of guiding principles, then translate them into your own flexible action plan on a week-by-week basis. I wrote about a “checklist” of fundamental principles here. […]

  4. […] or even looking really “thin.” Just get body fat moving in the right direction via an activity and nutrition approach that’s right for you, and it will work alongside all these other factors […]

  5. […] or even looking really “thin.” Just get body fat moving in the right direction via an activity and nutrition approach that’s right for you, and it will work alongside all these other factors […]

  6. […] is great news for guys whose fitness routine is consistent with OlderBeast principles: yoga and swimming, two fitness pillars I’ve urged you to include, provide “controlled […]

  7. […] Variety is critical as an overall philosophy (see this), but also you can do more workouts per week if you shift focus and stress among different body […]

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