My Own Medicine: Progress Update on OlderBeast Push-up Challenge

I hope some of you accepted the 90-Day Push-up Challenge published here recently. Here’s an update from my side, two weeks in.

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I hope some of you accepted the 90-Day Push-up Challenge published here recently.

QUICK UPDATE ON MY SIDE, 2.5 WEEKS IN

For the first two weeks, I took this approach (more details on these things in the original post, via the link above):

  • “Grease the groove” two days/week. That is, a manageable # of push-ups, many times throughout the day, to add up to a substantial total (200-300 range).
  • More traditional “handful of sets to point of muscle failure” approach on another day.
  • Other workouts that worked chest, shoulder, core muscles used for push-ups (swims + “metabolic resistance training,” a variation on HITT — more detail here)

That added up to 600-700 push-ups a week, plus other stresses and strains. While I’m glad for a strong start, this was borderline overdoing (shoulders especially kind of sore). So I’m backing off a little this week — never a bad thing if you’ve been going hard. Then I’ll add back more intensity for week 4, and see how I’m doing 1/3 of the way into the challenge.

Today, something new: “dead stop” push-up’s. You come to a complete, motionless stop at the bottom of each push-up, to focus on form and make each one a lot harder. I did ten sets of ten, every minute on the minute. The last few sets were hard to reach ten — surprisingly so. I’ll blend in this approach during the rest of the challenge.

TAKE ACTION

If you’re reading this as a fellow push-up doer — COOL. If you’re willing to share, please let me know how it’s going.

If not…I don’t want to sound whiny, man, but are you really going to make me do all these push-ups alone? C’mon, you can do this. We may be older than we once were, but we’re not OLD.

 

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