Guys, It’s Time for Your Weigh-in (Every Morning)

Are you a 40+ guy like me, striving for a long-term blend of balanced fitness, practical good nutrition, and lifelong happiness? If so, bodyweight is a key thing to track.

People hold strong and diverging views on how often to weigh yourself, but my friendly suggestion is simple: weigh every day!

Three reasons why…

by

Are you a 40+ guy like me, striving for a long-term blend of balanced fitness, practical good nutrition, and lifelong happiness? If so, your body weight is a key thing to really stay on top of.

People hold strong and diverging views on how often to weigh yourself, but my friendly suggestion is simple: weigh every day!

Three reasons why…

First, unless you’re consciously trying to gain muscle mass (and already have low body fat), we obviously don’t to gain weight. But think about the fact that, for a fitness plan designed to span decades, even a little bit of gain over time is “sneaky” worrisome*. If I gain two ounces per month, 20 years from now I’ll be 30 pounds overweight. I’m not just doing hypothetical math here…when I was 37, I looked at photos from a warm weather vacation and suddenly thought “who’s that pudgy guy in my bathing suit, hanging around with my family?” Little by little, I’d put on almost 20 pounds since college days.

It’s so much easier to make small corrections after a couple of pounds, versus waiting for a bigger number to develop.

But also, we need to be wary of losing weight. One reality of 40+ is the natural trend (if unchallenged) to lose muscle and bone density*. So, weighing ourselves every day helps ensure that diligent cardio exercise and watching our food intake don’t go too far the other direction from weight gain, starving our muscles of what they need to keep fighting Father Time and regenerating. If you burn good calories most days, and stress your muscles via exercise, you need to be sure you put enough back into the tank.

Note: if you’re consciously trying to lose weight because you need to, good on you, man. We’re all in that mode sometimes. In that case, I actually suggest not obsessing by weighing yourself every day. Instead, stay diligent on your exercise/nutrition program and check in on weight every several days, or weekly. Once you’ve achieved your target weight, then snap back into the approach described here.

Finally, a daily weight check provides a heads-up on dehydration. If you weigh two-plus pounds less than you did yesterday…you need to replenish fluids today. If your fitness mix includes a lot of sweat, this is always a risk, summer or winter. Not recognizing it means less energy today and poorer performance in all your endeavors – and that’s not part of our game plan.

weight-zone

So for all these reasons, brothers, I urge you to think of a four-pound range, bracketing your “fighting weight” by two pounds in each direction. Weigh yourself at the same time each day. If you’re too heavy or too light for 2-3 days in a row, that’s an early signal to make a fine-tuning correction. If you’re in the range – awesome. Enjoy today knowing that you’re taking care of yourself!

“He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.” (The Hollies, song of the same name)

* In the U.S. the average man gains about one pound per year after age 35 and throughout middle age – but that change includes about a half-pound yearly loss of muscle/bone density, so think +1.5 pounds of fat and -0.5 pounds of muscle/bone = 1 pound gain. As olderbeasts, we fight to buck this dynamic, not gain the fat, and not lose the muscle/bone mass!

You may also like

article-image
Fitness Planning & Gear , Philosophy & Motivation

Your Fitness Mix Beyond 40: Six Signs You May Need to Change It Up

To begin with, you DO need a well-balanced mix of fitness activities.

I don’t care if you can run far and fast, bike up steep hills, or lift impressive amounts. If any of those things is all you do, brother, you won’t have the best blend of endurance, strength, flexibility and balance to stay physically vital for your hopefully-many decades to come.

Past 40, God-given levels of these physical traits do start to erode. It’s only by our conscious and continuous effort, via a good fitness mix, that we maintain them. This foundational OlderBeast article talks more about this need to seek more diverse fitness.

OK, so what’s the best mix – what activities, how often? There’s no single “right” answer for everyone. Even your own personal mix will vary over the seasons and the years.

But there are clear signs you’ll see if your current mix isn’t working. Here are six I recognize. Any apply to you? If so, it might be time to mix things up more.

article-image
Fitness Planning & Gear , Philosophy & Motivation

“Too Busy” To Exercise Because You’re in “Survival Mode? Try This Minimum Fitness Plan…or Else

I have a few friends who are longtime habitual exercisers, but still look at me like I’m on a different planet when I talk about the finer points of moving from five to six workouts a week.

Why? They currently feel in “survival mode” with seemingly 24/7 work demands, business travel, and school-age kids in the house. The time when they can work out five-plus times a week seems somewhere down the road.

Fair enough. I’ve been there. But no matter what, when survival mode conditions last more than a week, you simply need to figure out how to maintain at least basic fitness.

There’s a minimum threshold below which “postponing fitness” is not the answer, even for short-term productivity, let alone long-term thriving.

So here are a few simple but powerful fitness and Wellness tactics to adopt when life puts you into survival mode.

article-image
Endurance , Fitness Planning & Gear , Mindfulness & Stress Management , Nutrition & Recipes , Strength

OlderBeast Weekly Web Picks: January 23, 2017

With all the great fitness, nutrition and wellness stuff out there on the Internet…there’s often too much to make sense of. Without an integrating philosophy and approach, it’s hard to interpret, prioritize and orchestrate everything into your own game plan. And your own plan is what you need, to sustain and thrive on for decades.

Helping you be your own Architect is OlderBeast’s core mission. Now, with OlderBeast philosophy as a foundation, we’re starting a weekly “best of the web” post at OlderBeast.com. For fitness, nutrition and Wellness categories, it features a single, useful pointer to highly-relevant and useful stuff.

article-image
Nutrition & Recipes

Upgrade Your Energy Bar: 10 Criteria + “Best of the Best” From Reviews

It’s amazing how ubiquitous energy bars have become. You often find an impressive selection in even modest convenience stores…and the category “bars” is even elevated onto supermarket aisle signs.

Since I eat healthy snacks a couple of times a day and travel a lot while trying to still eat well, the trusty energy bar has long been one of my staples.

I’ve tried a ton of ‘em, and dutifully read any best-of list I see on the Web.

Here’s how I suggest you think about criteria for the “best” energy bars. And, a synthesis of high-quality best-of lists. Combining these two views highlights five great bars you should try.

1 Comment
  1. […] simply know more-or-less how much, and what, to eat so that your weight holds pretty steady (see this about weighing yourself every […]

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.